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in the case regarding the legality of some of the charges. attempts by the u.s. government to legitimatize these military tribunals have been complicated by the fact that the only two convictions of guantanamo bay prisoners via tribunals have been reversed by civilian appeals courts. the administration is also facing heat over its continued reliance on drone strikes. according to figures compiled by the london-based bureau of investigative journalism, the u.s. has conducted 362 drone strikes in pakistan since 2004 with 128 in 2010 alone. the program's covert nature has alarmed civil rights activists and the human rights council has now launched an investigation into drone attacks connected to civilian casualties. joining us now to discuss the war on terror is the director of the aclu, national security project, hannah. thanks for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> this is a conversation that i think gradually is taking more of a role on center stage. especially with the appointment of john brennan and as we look at john kerry and chuck hagel. in terms of u.s. national security and
wondering whether this big change in our government was going to be allowed to stand or whether it might be fixed by filibuster reform on day one of the senate, the news today is that it is apparently still day one of the new senate. it has been weeks now, democrats could still do it, but they have not yet. tick toc k.now it is time for "the last word" with lawrence o'donnell. >>> tonight, the president's revolve has forced the republican's hand on the debt ceiling. and later in this hour, wayne lapierre, the lobbyist who makes sure that mass murderers have the most weapons, will make a statement in response to the president's inaugural address, in which of course the president said absolutely nothing about gun ownership or the second amendment. >> our conversation will look to vote on a measure tomorrow. >> the short term raise for the debt ceiling. >> three-month extension of the debt ceiling. >> temporary extending for debt ceiling. >> what is the republican strategy here? >> three months is not good enough. >> they may not even vote for this. >> it is about time we come together, do
sequesters with cuts in other areas of government. we have shown how to protect defense spending by cutting spending in other areas. in our budget last year, we did take money out of defense. just not nearly as much as the president seems to want to. but we think the sequesters will happen because the democrats have opposed our efforts to replace those cuts with others and offered no alternatives. >> is this worth shutting the government down over? >> no one is talking about shutting the government down. >> well, it's a piece of the leverage that conservatives have. you didn't want to fight over the debt ceiling because you thought you can't do that, you have to pay the government's bills. do you think this fight over priority is worth shutting the government down? >> we're not interested in shutting the government down. what happens on march 1 is spending goes down automatically. march 27 is when the moment you're talking about, the continuing resolution expires. we are more than happy to keep spending at those levels going on into the future while we debate how to balance the budget, grow
this libyan government have the will and capacity to have the suspects involved and i think they have to strain the capacity to try to arrest powerful armed elements in the eastern part of the country and i don't know if they have it even if they have the will to use that capacity. can you tell us after the attack that they are trying to bring the culprits to justice, what do you think of the libyan government. >> you drew exactly the right description. is it well or capacity? what you need is both. i found the libyan officials to be willing, but without capacity. part of our challenge is to help them build greater capacity because it's about them. it's not only about what happened to us in benghazi which every official in the libyan government was deeply upset about, but they have their own problems now. they are having leaders attack and assassinated on a regular basis. we have to do more to build up the security capacity and i would ask this committee to work with us. there holds on a lot of the security funding that go to kwlab to assist them in building capacity. there those i kn
knew more about libya than anybody else in our government did not see a direct threat of an attack of this nature and scale despite the overall trend of security problems that we faced. and i have to add, neither did the intelligence community. the arb makes that very clear. that the intelligence community also did not really zero in on the connection between the deteriorating threat environment in eastern libya and in benghazi. and a direct threat on our compound. so we have work to do. we have work to do inside the department. we have work to do with our partners and the d.o.d. and the intelligence community to constantly be taking in information, making sure it does get to the right people, that it isn't somehow stove piped or stalled. but that it does rise to decision makers. and i'm committed to improving every way that i can on what the arb told us to do on assessing our intelligence. and i think it's fair to say, congressman, that we have to do this now because i predict we're going to be as we saw in algeria seeing all kinds of asymmetric threats. not just to our government
was worn some as the 40th president of the united states ushering in an era of limited government and the rise of the modern conservative movement. yesterday barack obama, the 44th president of the united states, was sworn in for his second term. the moment that will define progressive politics m years to come and one that symbolizes a renewed faith and the power of the american government. needless to say, it was a day several decades in the making. >> for the first time in history government, the people said, was not our master. it is our servant. >> government is not the problem, and government is not the solution. we, the american people, we are the solution. >> the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medicaid and social security, these things do not sapp our nation. they strengthen us. they do not make us a taker of nags. they free us to take the risks that make this country great. >> as he made a forceful case for economic equality and the social safety net president obama championed the american belief in equality of race, gender, and sexual orientation,
outrageous government dependent parties that we've ever seen in modern time. you have delivered less and less from our economy, particularly for hispanics and african-americans. >> dana, the stock market is at a five-time high -- a five-year high. unemployment is at a five-year low. he says on the one hand he wants to reach out. you can see the shares in the dow jones right now. what is this man talking about? please, translate it because i'm not intelligent enough to understand it. >> there is apparently a bit of a mixed message occurring at the rnc winter meeting. >> in the very brain of the chairman. >> i think bobby jindal had a point where he said we need to stop being the party of austerity. we need to stop saying how good we can be at shrinking and cutting government. that is not a winning message. he's absolutely right about that. and then you have the party here in washington doing exactly what he said not to do, and you have paul ryan coming forward and saying, yes, i'm going to -- we lost the election so i'm actually going to double down on this. i'm going to cut 40% of the federal
about trying it help this government stand up security and deal with what is a very dangerous environment, from east to west, then we have to work together. i also hope we're looking forward, because right now, libya is still dangerous, it is still in a very unstable status, and whatever we can do for them, we at least ought to agree we need to do and get out there and start delivering. >> one of the members of the senate foreign relations committee, who is asking questions, is the new hampshire senator jean chacin, former governor, democratic member of the committee, who was in the hearing room. you're joining us right now from the russell building. senator shaheen? and as we wait for senator shaheen to get all hooked up there and get the audio straightened out, we've been talking about hillary clinton's testimony today in the senate. this afternoon she's going to be testifying in the house, the house foreign relations committee, which has been just as tough, if not more so than the senators have been, on the record of why susan rice was the person going out on the sunday tal
.com/thankyoucards to apply. >> remake our government and revamp our tax code. >> the era of liberalism is back. >> medicare and medicaid. >> far left center. >> social security. >> president obama being accused of trying to annihilate the gop by pushing a far left agenda, but is he really that liberal? good shouldn't afternoon to you. i'm craig melvin. you're watching msnbc. we'll also look at how the worlds of sports and politics collide, and this. >> we're all getting a little emotional and sentimental around here. >> hillary clinton bowing out of state department, but she's hardly bowing out of politics. a view from inside hillaryland. that's coming up, and on this international holocaust remembrance day, we talk to nobel peace prize winner ely weizel about what we learned and what we have yet to understand. >> first though guns on the agenda this week in washington. the senate on wednesday will hold first congressional hearing on gun violence since president obama announced his gun control proposals. mark kelley, the husband of former congresswoman gabrielle giffords who was seriously injured in a mass
. they are extremists and they have designs on overthrowing existing governments, even those new islamists governments of controlling territory. although there has been the decimation of al qaeda, we do have could contend with the want to bes and affiliated going forward. >> thank you. >> thank you mr. chairman and thank you, madam secretary, for being here. and it's great to see you today. you have been i think a real dedicated public serve ant for your country and your travels around the world, the million miles that you've put on and all of the countries you visited. and i think you've been to many countries where they've never had a secretary of state. and i've seen firsthand when i've been to many of these countries, the difference it makes to have you there on the ground. so i first of all just want to thank you for that and i know it does take a toll but you are incredibly dedicated to that. secondly, it's great to see you here in good health. >> thank you. >> smiling and engaging with all of us. and i want to add to the list people -- senators going down the line talked about some of your acco
organic law. and saying that the constitution could not possibly have anticipated our every governing question. i invite you to imagine if you will, just close your eyes and just imagine the right wing outcry. if president obama called the constitution organic law. instead of saying this. liberals have always understood that, they understood it when president lincoln said it and when president obama said it. but conservatives have never, ever understood that when times change, so must we. and the day conservatives actually do understand that, they will no longer be conservatives. >>> obama land. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this. yesterday we discovered the obama doctrine. put simply, it's to continue the american revolution well into the 21st century. defined economic equality for women, full equality all out for gay people. and full political and financial opportunity for people of color. everything about yesterday screamed with this manifesto from the makeup of the crowd to the people in the inaugural platf
're the people matching at selma. you're having your civil rights denied. >> the government doesn't have a role in contraception. government does have a role in protecting your civil rights. especially today, on martin luther king day. >> i think martin luther king would agree with me if he were alive today that if african americans had been given the right to keep and bear arms from day one of the country's founding, perhaps slavery might not have been a chapter in our history. >> two misquote leaders and figures that fought for freedom and inequality is dishonest. to misuse them is disgraceful. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >>> hillary kicks butt. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this. secretary of state hillary clinton was at her best today appearing between both senate and house committees on foreign affairs. she showed acuity, humility, and charm. she showed candor and humility in place of the state department handling of the horror. she admitted to -- in response to hostile questio
. and lastly, government programs. president obama took a shot at republicans when he said this about entitlements. >> the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medicaid and social security, these things do not zap our initiative. they strengthen us. they do not make us a nation of takers. they free us to take the risks that make this country great. >> i'll take that poll. the public's predominantly in favor here. when we polled on medicare, 54% said it only needed minor modifications if anything. joining us david corn and michael scherer. gentlemen, thank you. i didn't know this until you put it all together. i have a sense that on the right if you're a moderate positions like these polls say, you're considered a liberal. if you're in the middle, the right sees you as the left. it's true. what do you think? >> well, i think the right is screaming that this is a liberal speech which should come as no surprise. barack obama has always been a progressive democrat. a pragmatist as a government manager, but progressive in his values. >> i know you're on the progressive si
orders. putting pressure on our state governments because there are areas, for example, fracking that are unregulated. deforestation. i think when we concentrate on just the congress national level we get frustrated and we get to the point where we say nothing is going to be done. if we look at cobbling together the different approaches, i think we can move forward. >> this idea that was brought up about the tragedies that lead us to say we must do something then the idea of using executive orders and cobbling things together. i wonder, part of what gave me a gut reaction to the oh now that hurricane sandy happened is whoa, these injustices have been so real for communities without resources, without power and often communities of color for so long. it feels a little bit like these lives and bodies matter and these other ones don't. >> exactly. what we see is that we see the climate impacts right now. we know that in alaska native americans are being relocated away from receding shorelines. we have seen what's happened in terms of civil disruption in new orleans. now we have sand
is all about. people who maintain an almost total skepticism about what government can accomplish for the good of this country. he talked about all the good things government does, whether it's education or it's a safety net or it's regulation when it has to be done in terms of big business. he launched all those good reasons and then he said, of course, there are people who retain a reasonable skepticism about the role of government in this country. that debate is going to continue. i thought that was an amazing effort. he's not going to win any support from the tea party. he might win though, the congressman may know better, he might be able to make some of the people who represent the suburbs who are not so far right realize this guy is not their enemy. he is somewhat to their left but he's probably as reasonable as anybody to their right in terms of politics these days. >> chris -- >> i think the battle today is between people that want government to function, want the debate to continue, and people that want to take their ball and go home and end government, shut it down, use
, but it has to have a component of the state and government to help foster it, and the line that really stuck out to me was these truths can be self-evident, but they're not self-executing. what he made was a case for why there is an important role for the government to play to basically protect our rights but also to advance us as a society whether it's on climate change, immigration reform, bank regulations, and so on down the list. it was a progressive case, but it wasn't necessarily a big government case. saying there's a mix of -- >> let's talk about some examples. i think you know them. the right wing ideas of rights is leave me alone, i got enough guns here in this house to hold you off for a couple days anyway if the government comes in with helicopters. progressives' idea of rights is a couple young people would like to go to the university of mississippi. it took the federal troops to go in there to get them in the door. a governor named george wallace tried to stop people at the door at the university of alabama, they had to be pushed aside. that's an aggressive communitarian notio
that is the federal budget. we have seemed to have an obsession with government bookkeeping. this is a rigged game, and it is the wrong game for us to play. >> and in a barely veiled reference to mitt romney and other republicans, jindal said republicans need to make it clear that they are a, quote, populous party. >> we must quit being -- we are not the party of big business, big banks, big wall street bailouts, big corporate looph e loopholes, or big anything. we must not be the party that simply protects the welloff, so they can keep their toys. >> nbc's senior political editor, mark murray is here, and he joins me now. and mark, it seems is if at any time a party gets thumped, they always have this come to jesus moment. we need to change what we've been doing before, we need to radically alter our strategy. reince priebus is going to say this to the rnc. "it's time to stop lacking at elections through the lens of battleground states. we have four years until the next presidential election, and being a blue state is not a permanent diagnosis. simple outreach a few months before an election wil
's gun-control proposals. while the government has come out against the plan, the numbers are pretty stark. 53% are favorable. 41%, unfavorable. more interesting as you go into the poll, the favorables are much more intense than the unfavorables. which means that we've heard for some time, richard wolffe, you know, the gun owners are so intense, and they're the ones that are going to always make phone calls and they're the ones that are always going to be engaged. in this poll and i'm sure we'll see it in other polls, a majority of americans are more intense about passing some sane gun regulation than are those small groups of people that are going to fight the political death over assault weapons and being able to have high-capacity magazines. >> a couple of things. first of all, if you break down the individual proposals, the support is even higher, right? universal background checks, you get way higher than 50%. and those numbers reflect the president's own favorability right now which says this is the moment when he can actually push this through because his own numbers are so hi
yesterday with secretary of state clinton was that america is dealing with nations whose own governments are in a shambles. and yet people like conservative chris stevens thought itthe bes way to make progress was to be there. you say we have to have relationships with these nations, but if those governments are in such a shambles, what's the alternative. how do we resolve that? >> i'm glad you raised those points. i know a lot of not only military personnel who are very brave but state department personnel who are very brave and yet when they take risks and when a benghazi consulate is overrun, we consider that fundamentally unacceptable. it is a terrible tragedy, but it is part of the risk in this world of being in places where you need to be when situations are not always stable. now, to your point about whether all governments can be worked with or cooperated with, of course, there are some governments that just aren't even trying or are in ka hoocah against us. but in a place like libya, i think the real issue is how do we get that young government get on its feet. it's generally we
many departments throughout government, has numbers of challenges. we saw systemic issues that nide to be addressed and they're in the process of being addressed right now. our nation has budgetary constraints, which means that in all of these departments, creativity is going to have to be utilized to make sure we make the most of what we have and making sure that our u.s. interests are put forth. we have a world that is a dangerous world. and things continue to come over the transom. sometimes it's at surprising times. i know as secretary of state, you're going to have to lead our country in addressing those as they come about. i do hope that you'll work closely with this committee as you have worked very closely with this committee over the last many years. and helping us work with you to make sure that as we move ahead, we move ahead together. and that it's seamless. we have many challenges, and i know on monday, president obama said that america will remain the anchor of strong challenges in every corner of the globe. and we will renew those institutions that extend our capacity
of the world that are struggling to build new governments from what has often been a chaotic situation and underscore the very real courage of the unsung men and women who put their lives at risk to serve this nation's interests in those areas. let me say i respect what you have done during your tenure as secretary of state in representing not only this nation, but all of those in our foreign service, who are on the diplomatic front line in turbulent and dangerous parts of the globe. it's a reflection of your leadership, as well as your patriotism and your abiding belief in the power of our policies to move the world towards democracy, peace, and preservation of human rights. your candor before this committee has been a trademark of your service as secretary of state, and i believe that every member has always welcomed your openness and your cooperation. your letter of december 18th to chairman kerry was appreciated by members of both sides, as another example of that openness and cooperation. let me say, we share your mission here today, and that we look forward to a constructive dial
somali government which could never have been possible without american support and multilateralism. because the u.n. was strongly behind it. we got other nations to invest. what we're looking at now in west africa is to help support an african au blessed supported troop combination from a number of countries to really take the lead against the terrorists in northern mali. again, this is -- you know, this is hard. if the united states comes in and does something on our own and i appreciated what congressman kizinger said, nobody can match us in military prowess. but a lot of the challenges we face are not immediately or sustainbly solved by military action alone. therefore we've got to get countries in the region to increase their border security, to increase their anti-terrorist, counter-terrorist efforts inside their own borders. we have a lot to do now in west africa. so i think you're right to point out the united states has to play a role, but it needs to be part of a multilateral effort in order to have a chance at success. >> thank you, madam secretary. we've discussed many i
, it was very different from the way he, you know, governed for the last four years or attempted to govern. he came at it from sort of a centrist, pragmatist approach, and it didn't work out so well for him a lot of the times. he faced a congress in republican hands for the last two years in the house that did not, you know, accept his agenda or pass it through the way he would like it. so i think he learned from this election, gave him the confidence to say the election delivered a mandate for my vision of government, my vision of politics, one that involves gay rights, immigration, climate change, an issue that he hasn't really spoken of since his attempts to deal with it in 2009, fell short. so this was really a different president coming out, using the election as a turning point for his agenda and really making clear that that cautious pragmatist of the last four years, that often came out, is going to give way to someone who is unabashedly starting negotiations from a more progressive liberal standpoint than he was willing to do in the recent past. >> not surprisingly, there's been some
and it needs to be part of the strategy that make sure as we support alternative governments and the rebels that there is a strong priority in protecting the source of these weapons not ending up harming americans or harming our interests. >> well, senator, you're absolutely right. one of the reasons that we and other government agencies is exactly that, we have a concerted effort to try to track down and find and recover as many man pads and other dangerous weapons as possible. libya was a wash in weapons before the revolution. obviously there were additional weapons introduced. but the vast, vast majority came out of gadhafi warehouses and as they were saying, liberated and then went on the black market. were seized by militias and seized by other groups and have made their way out of libya into other countries in the region. and have their made way to syria, we believe. it is a red line for this administration with respect to syria concerning the use of chemical weapons. syria as you probably know in addition to having the fourth largest army before this revolution, has a very significan
government was going to be allowed to stand or whether it might be fixed by filibuster reform on day one of the senate, the news today is that it is apparently still day one of the new senate. it has been weeks now, democrats could still do it, but they have not yet. tick tock now it is time for o fixed by filibuster reform on day one of the senate, the news today is that it's still day one of the new senate. it's been weeks now. democrats could still do it, but they have not yet. tick tock. "first look" is up next. >>> good wednesday morning. right now on "first look," baby it's cold outside. from the single digits and below to snow and dangerous roads. details in seconds. >>> secretary of state hillary clinton's health is back in order as she prepares for tough questioning. >>> and serena williams loses the match and her cool. another school shooting, this one in texas. and wait until you hear what senator john mccain said about waterboarding and john kerry. good morning, i'm mara schiavocampo. a bitterly cold arctic blast is gripping half the nation this morning. exposure is suspecte
. it was forth right in setting out a vision of a kind of government that obama wants. in a way, it was, like, it was kind of a liberal version of reagan's first inaugural where he disparaged government. this was a firm defense of a word he dared to use. of clengtive action. and bill the way, that one drove them nuts at fox news. >> well, bob, the president referenced this early in his speech, very much like lincoln did. >> for history tells us that while these truths may be self evident, that they've never been self executing. that while freedom is a gift from god, it must be secured by his people here on earth. the patriots of 1776 did not fight to replace the tyranny of a king with the privileges of a few. or the rule of a mob. they gave to us a republic, a government of and by and for the people. in trusting each generation to keep safe our founding creed. >> i think i've heard this from liberals and i think it's something very important. we all accept the fact that our rights are innate, they come with our birth, they aren't given to us by a government. but, oftentimes, it has taken a go
and stayed in close contact with officials from across the government and the libyan government. i did see what the ambassador and the chairman called timely and exceptional coordination. no delays in decision making and no denials of support from washington or the military. i want to echo the praise for the valor and courage of the people on the ground, especially security professionals in benghazi and tripoli. the board said our response saved lives in realtime and it did. the very next morning, i told the american people and i quote, heavily armed militants assaulted the compound and vowed to bring them to justice. i stood later that day with president obama as he spoke of an act of terror. you may recall at the same time period we were also seeing violent attacks on our embassies in cairo, tunas as well as large protests outside many other posts from india to indonesia where thousands of our diplomats serve. i ordered a review of the security posture around the world with particular scrutiny for high threat posts. i asked the department of defense to join inner agency security assessme
the laebtory is in the states where republican governors are governing, and they can put them to practice those principles as we saw with scott walker. god bless scott walker in his ability to stand firm on those principles and move the people to his view and position on why the economic strategy and approach he was taking was important for the longer term health of his state. those are the good examples of success -- those governors in very tough states for republicans by and large are doing well because they have married up those principles with the policies in a way that the american -- that the people in their state appreciate. not just the activists in the party. >> thank you very much. the state of emergency in egypt. we'll be live in cairo. >> how could the political unrest in egypt impact president obama's second term? you're watching andrea mitchell reports only on msnbc. [ coughs ] [ angry gibberish ] i took something for my sinuses, but i still have this cough. [ male announcer ] a lot of sinus products don't treat cough. they don't? [ male announcer ] nope, but alka seltzer plus sev
'm a liberal, and i'm going to govern as a liberal, and i won. so there. >> the mayor of cable tv believes it's proof that america will be torn apart. >> rather than focusing on america's problems like exploding debt and a weak economy, mr. obama put forth that the nation's top priority must be impose social justice. so it is quite clear that the president is willing to go down in history as a crusader for social justice, no matter what happens to the economic fabric of the country. >> you know, i think all these conservatives are forgetting about another president who transformed the country, and he is i think one of their favorites, ronald reagan. remember that guy? inherited a population deeply unhappy with the direction of the country and the economy. he established mainstream conservative government by his second inauguration, a majority of the country believed in his message. >> we ask things of government that government was not equipped to give. we yielded authority to the national government that property belonged to states or to local governments or to the people themselves. we allo
and complex government. i know he's run a health clinic before, but, obviously, he hasn't run a multifaceted global organization. >> karen, you worked for hillary clinton. she was nothing, if not, defiant this morning. how -- what was your read on her pushback, what difference does it make as far as the sort of tick tock on when the administration admitted there were protests or no protests. >> what struck me was that when she testified on health care when she was first lady, it was clear very quickly she knew more about the subject matter than the questions. that seemed to be true with the republicans. rand paul is all about 2016 and ron johnson had his talking points he wanted to get in, and she doesn't suffer fools, particularly on something like this, where i think as you saw at the beginning, it's personal. this is a big deal. this is very serious. this shouldn't be about, you know, the talking points that we were talking about back during the campaign. this should be about how do we move forward, particularly given i think we now can see sort of a bigger picture of what's happening in
government. there are actually more federal regulation on manufacturing bb guns than there are real guns, so it really is, you know, francly ridiculous when you look at it like that, and i think what you brought up of guns making it into the illegal market, which is a big problem, we have to realize that 40% of all gun sales in this country every year go unchecked. i mean, that's a really easy way for a legitimate gun to fall into the hands of an illegitimate person, and we need to fix that problem, and the president's proposals will do just that. >> let me bring in our wonderful panel here in new york. hans, harry reid is bringing to theoretically going to bring this legislation forward to the floor of the senate and open amendment process, which a lot of people think is going to fundamentally water down some of the provisions because basically everybody gets to throw their 2 cents in. your read on that and your sort of optimism with regard to real reform. >> well, most of those serious reform efforts right now will have a ledges lafsh process, and we can game out how it's going to go. you'
privileged, selective use of government and public moneys to save selected group of people and allow other people, particularly the millions with the homes foreclosed to fend for themselves and the market rally, not just today but the markets doing extremely well over the past months, it kind of depend. great if you're in the markets and right if you have a 401(k) you are in the market but most people don't have a 401(k). many people do. >> when we talk about his legacy, is it really going to be the phrase to big too fail? >> i think that's what's stuck to him right now. whatever sticks to someone in realtime, you know, may or may not -- >> perception is reality. >> but only reality for the time that it's reality. meaning, truman went out of office with the lowest public approval ratings of man kind and what history says about timothy geithner we leave to the future in that it's clear there's systemic stability. we can debate about whether or not we are where we are want to be and going to go where we want to go. but i think it's very difficult to make the argument we're worse off today th
wanted. and how the government would verify the enforcement that has been enhanced they're describing in this draft so far. take a listen to what bob corker said on fox yesterday on "get your response." >> details matter. i think right now they're at the talking point stage and this needs to be reduced to legislation. the last time this blew up was when it was reduced to legislation. so it's my hope that we will come up with a bipartisan solution. >> nick, what are some of the details you think that, look, it's four pages right now. we're early on. what details need to be hammered out? >> the basic thing is that first the security measures to reduce immigration are being -- that has to be worked out first. plus limitations on hiring of illegal immigrants. only when that is in place do you begin to have this pathway to citizenship. i think that hammering out those security details, determining what is enough, is going to be really tough. but, you know, i really -- it really does feel to me as if right now the democrats desperately would like this legacy issue and republicans desperatel
allies combined. the state department is the only part of the u.s. government that fields high-level personnel doing high security, high tension work in highly sensitive places around the globe alongside the intelligence and the military, except they, the state department employees are the ones who have to do it on a shoestring budget, whose budget and resources are minuscule in comparison and under pressure, under pressure compared to the other ways that americans serve long-terms abroad in dangerous places. the best hope for the state department ever getting its due in washington, ever upscaling its profile and its respect and its resources in washington was probably to put the biggest political star in the modern era of this country who is not a president in charge of that agency, right? the highest profile american woman in politics ever, a woman who transfixes the media and the political class wherever she goes. if the state department was ever going to get what it needed to protect its people to advance its mission, to assume its rightful place among the american mega age
cut spending. if that means shut down the government, shut down the government. >> i think in williamsburg we saw one possibility, which was paul ryan and others within the republican party saying to the caucus, we can't win this fight publicly. let the debt ceiling go because we're going to be blamed for the economic fallout. let's push that down the road kick the can down the road, as they say, and try to get some budget out of the senate and try to get some real spending cuts in the next three months. so paul ryan and others within the caucus are seeing a longer game here than is this freshman senator from texas. >> but if you ask paul ryan what he wants to do on gun control, he would say, i don't want to do anything on gun control. you've talked to moderate republicans -- >> what about registration? >> the only thing they might do is something on registration. >> background checks. >> that's it. no idea that you're banning weapons. no chance. >> registration is the worst. >> put it on tape. 5 0% chance it passes. >> good because hunters need 30 bullets
of federal government for downloading too many articles, some of which were free, he was a target because the state wanted to make an example of someone who powerful questioned authority. here's aaron explaining his activism in 2010. >> i feel, you know, very strongly that it's not enough to just live in the world as it is, to just kind of take what you're given and, you know, follow the things that adults told you to do and that, you know, your parents told you to do and that society tells you to do. i think you should always be questioning. i take this very scientific attitude that everything you've learned is provisional. it's always open to recantation or questioning. and i think the same applies to society. i felt growing up, you know, i slowly had this process of realizing that all the things around me that people had told me were just the natural way things were, the thing way things always would be, they weren't natural at all and they could be changed and more importantly, could be changed. >> aaron presents a unique threat to the government for being to do what most activists ca
it calls for how they will pay for the government going forward. after march 27th the budget issues are high on the priority list. there are challenges as he faces the republican house. he heard from paul ryan and dick durbin and their opinions on what the president needs to do going forward. >> the green line is historic tax rates, how much we raise in taxes and the blue is how many increases president obama is calling for. the red is where spending is going. spending is the problem, revenues are not the problem. if you keep chasing them they will hurt economic growth, shut down the economy and won't get the budget balanced. >> what i heard the president say was programs like social security and medicare and med aid critically important for our future and we need to have a bipartisan commitment to make them work. bob and i have been in a lot of meetings talking about deficit reduction. we need reform in the programs that mean they will live on to serve future generations. that's the message i took from the president. >> referring to bob corker to the left of the screen. the preside
really helps explain, at least in part, why the u.s. government is so reticent to help syrians. >> yes, right. >> because, as was pointed out during kerry's confirmation hearing for secretary of state this past week, you know, when john mccain said are we or are we not the friends of the syrian people? it was senator kerry who pointed out that, you know, this is a country not unlike many in the region that has so many dimensions to it, not the least of which is what happens, you know, once the various sectarian factions, sunni, shia, drews, et cetera, how do they play out? what happens with the kurds? where are the arms going? where is the money going? and in a way -- sorry, just to finish up the point. in a way this is the obliqueness phyllis is talking about. nobody is going to say look at what has happened with libya. they're not going to say that, obviously. but this is part of the lesson learning mission that soon-to-be secretary kerry is on and needs to be on in order to figure out how do we not be part of the problem anymore. >> that's absolutely right. it's libya we did interve
. reinvigorating a mature nation means giving government to give people the tools to compete but then opening up a wide field so they do so ruak cowsly creatively. it means spending more here but de regulating more there. it means facing the fact we do have to choose between current benefits to seniors and investments in our future, and that to pretend we don't face that choice as obama did is effectively to sacrifice the future to the past. >> jonathan, first, what do you think of this speech and secondly, what do you think of david's column? >> i thought the president's speech was terrific, a progressive vision for the country. the guy won twice and ran on all the things he talked about yesterday, inclusion, balanced approach to the nation's problems. when it comes to david brooks' column, as mika was reading, i was thinking, how is that different from what the president actually said? i mean, he's talking about how, you know, what he wants to do is what he's been saying all along, a balanced approach. we have to take care of our seniors and take care of the middle class. we have to take care
question is who does he choose in a coalition to govern with? the smart money is on him lining up with even more hard-line parties to his right which, of course, is the nightmare scenario for palestinians. or he could surprise everyone and team up with a more centrist bloc, and that would probably give him more wiggle room, at least that's what the analysts are saying, to deal with the stalled peace talks and what israelis are calling a tanking economy. and the horse trading begins as early as tomorrow morning. mara? >> and let's turn, if we can, to elsewhere in the region to syria where russia is sending planes to lebanon to evacuate citizens from the region. now, what kind of sign does that send to assad's government in syria? >> reporter: well, that's a very good question. first of all, the russian government's making this look like an evacuation, a short-term evacuation, only for those who want to leave the region. but russian officials are underscoring that, you know, there are tens of thousands of russians living and working in syria. it's their former client state. russia has a warm-
that is in fact the governing philosophy of this country. we're a liberal country. we are not a center-right country the way the right always wants to tell us. we are a country where liberal policies are widely popular and, frankly, at the national level we express that right now by mostly voting for democrats. by a lot. that's the portrait of the country that the president was painting this week in his second inaugural, in tying this list of what get described as liberal policies to fundamental centrist, widely acknowledged, basically universal american values. >> we hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. today we continue a neverending journey to bridge the meaning of those words with the realities of our time. for history tells us that while these truths may be self-evident they have never been self-executing. that while freedom is a gift from god it must be secured by his people here on earth. >> and then president
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